MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21 - DR DAN KASHIAN presents OF COCKROACHES AND TREES: THE OUTLOOK FOR ASH IN SOUTHEASTERN MICHIGAN IN THE AFTERMATH OF EMERALD ASH BORER.

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21 -

7:30 OM at Matthaei Botanical Garden

DR DAN KASHIAN presents OF COCKROACHES AND TREES: THE OUTLOOK FOR ASH IN SOUTHEASTERN MICHIGAN IN THE AFTERMATH OF EMERALD ASH BORER.

Emerald ash borer (EAB) has killed millions of trees near its introduction point in southeastern Michigan, and many have predicted the elimination of ash from the landscape. Almost 15 years after the introduction of EAB, however, we still find ash in the "aftermath" forests, as surviving trees and sprouts, both of which are producing an abundance of seed and new ash seedlings. With EAB still present at low populations in the area, is ash resilient enough to survive this devastating invasive species? Dan Kashian is an Associate Professor at Wayne State University, where he teaches and conducts research in forest and landscape ecology. He studies the effects and interactions of human and natural disturbances on forest structure and ecosystem processes. Dr. Kashian’s research in Michigan in part examines the dynamics of jack pine forests and barrens in northern Lower Michigan and the ecological effects of the emerald ash borer in southern Michigan.