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Huron Valley Chapter

HVC meetings are held on the 3rd Monday, September through April, excepting December, at 7:30 pm at the Matthaei Botanical Gardens auditorium, 1800 N. Dixboro Rd. Ann Arbor, MI 48105.  Meetings are free and open to the public, however, there is a fee for parking that supports MBGNA.

Field trips are mainly in the growing season, but also occasionally held during winter season.

For events and up to date information about the activities of the Huron Valley Chapter, please visit our blog.

Huron Valley Chapter Contacts 2013 -2014

Officers  

President Anton Reznicek <reznicek@umich.edu>  (734)764-5544

Vice President Ron Gamble

Secretary  Sarah Nooden 734-663-5667

Treasurer  Toni Spears 734-424-2530

Director at Large 

Director at Large  Beverly Walters 734-358-294

Director at Large  Sarah Nooden 734-663-5667

Immediate Past President Larry Noodén 734-663-5667

Committees

Program  Ron Gamble

Publication  Sarah Nooden 734-663-5667

Nominating  Irene Eiseman 734-475-9654, Sarah Nooden 734-663-5667, Beverly Walters 734-358-2946

Field Trip  Robert Ayotte:  Oikos14@Outlook.com (734)-718-6114

Artist  Artemis Eyster 

Huron Valley Chapter Meetings 2013 - 2014

 7:30 pm at the Matthaei Botanical Gardens auditorium, 1800 N. Dixboro Rd. Ann Arbor, MI 48105

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER  16, 2013 - BIODIVERSITY OF AQUATIC PLANTS—TEMPERATE VERSUS NEOTROPICS: IS NORTHEASTERN NORTH AMERICA THE AMAZONIA OF DIVERSITY FOR AQUATIC PLANTS? presented by Dr. Garrett E. Crow, Professor Emeritus, University of New Hampshire.   The lecture focuses on Garrett Crow's work on the diversity of aquatic plants in Costa Rica and Bolivia over many years and formed the basis for a paper he was invited to present at an Aquatic Plant symposium in Medellin, Colombia, in spring of 2007. What surprised him was the level of diversity of aquatic plants in tropical regions.

Dr. Crow recently retired after teaching taxonomy for 33 years at the University of New Hampshire and serving as Director of the UNH Herbarium and chair of the Department of Plant Biology, has returned to Michigan where he is continuing botanical research at the Michigan State University Herbarium-recently having completed the taxonomic treatment of Utricularia (bladderworts) and Pinguicula (butterworts) for Flora of North America North of Mexico.   While having a broad interest in floristics (including botanical expeditions to Tierra del Fuego, Siberia, Crimea and Caucasus, Costa Rica, Bolivia, Amazonia, and Mexico), much of his research has focused on aquatic plants of temperate and Neotropics regions. He is co-author of Aquatic and Wetland Plants of Northeastern North America, 2 volumes (G.E. Crow and C. B. Hellquist, Univ. Wisconsin Press). In 1999-2000 he spent a year-long sabbatical in Costa Rica under a Fulbright Fellowship where he wrote a bilingual field guide, Plantas acuáticus de Parque Nacional Palo Verde, Costa Rica (Instituto Nacional de Biodiversidad, Costa Rica), which is widely used by students studying at the Organization for Tropical Studies field station at Palo Verde.

Saturday, OCTOBER 12, 2013  - 1:30 to 5 p.m. is the Michigan Botanical Club State Fall Meeting, hosted by our own Huron Valley Chapter and to be held at the Gerald E. Eddy Discovery Center in the >20,000 acre Waterloo State Recreation Area near Chelsea, Michigan. “Alaska Botany – Tall timbers to Tundra” will be presented by Tony Reznicek. A field trip centered on the evergreen lycopods is to be led by Connie Crancer. See Fall Arisaema for details.

OCTOBER 21 - NATIVE BEES AND HONEY BEES: Their Ecology and Pollination of Native Plants and Crops - JULIANNA WILSON, PhD.   Dr. Julianna Wilson, an entomologist from MSU will be speaking about how to identify common, non-honey-making, wild bees in Michigan, where they are likely to nest, what they require to thrive, and useful tips for promoting them in your garden. She will also talk about honey bee biology, the current status of both honey bees and wild bees, simple conservation strategies that anyone can employ, and why bees need conserving as pollinators of many of the foods we eat. Joint with Ann Arbor WildOnes

NOVEMBER 18 - THREE MONTHS IN THE FOREST - AMANDA KLAIN , local botanical naturalist, will share a program focusing on the flora and character of Michigan’s Manistee National Forest which she experienced while working for the US Forest Service this past summer. 

JANUARY 20 - MICHIGAN WILDFLOWERS THROUGH THE SEASONS – TOM HODGSON. Tom Hodgson will share stories and images of Michigan’s most beautiful and interesting wildflowers, from the first blooms of spring to the last flowers of autumn.  Most of the images were taken in Jackson and Washtenaw Counties.

Tom Hodgson has been a naturalist and environmental educator for over forty years; including fifteen as the Park interpreter for the Waterloo Recreation Area, seventeen as the Director of the Dahlem Environmental Education Center in Jackson, and eight as an instructor at Eastern Michigan University. He currently serves on the Boards of Directors of the Waterloo Natural History Association and the Jackson Audubon Society and is a member of the Phyllis Haehnle Memorial Sanctuary Committee.

FEBRUARY 17 - REGIONAL CONSERVATION PLAN FOR THE OAK OPENINGS REGION – STEVEN WOODS, The Nature Conservancy Oak Openings Program Manager.  Steve is a native of Michigan. He has a Bachelor’s of Science in Environmental Science from Lake Superior State University and a Master’s of Science in Environmental Forest Biology from the State University of New York college of Environmental Science and Forestry. He has worked for TNC for 11 years, first as a Land Steward in Michigan and now serves as Oak Openings Program Manager in Swanton, OH.  He is Chairman of the Green Ribbon Initiative, a partnership composed of over a dozen private and public conservation organizations committed to protecting the 7 county Lakeplains Oak Openings Region of NW Ohio and SE Michigan.

MARCH 17 – PLANT ADAPTATIONS TO THE AQUATIC REALM - DR. GARY HANNAN. We will explore the unique aspects of underwater habitats that present both opportunities and challenges  to plants that live underwater.  Plant Adaptations will be discussed in the context of the problems associated with life underwater. 

Dr. Hannan is a professor in biology at Eastern Michigan University where he has taught field courses on aquatic plants, woody plants, plant classification, biogeography, among others, for many years. His research interest is plant reproductive biology.

 APRIL 21 - INFERRING POPULATION STRUCTURE IN THE CARNIVOROUS PITCHER PLANT, SARRACENIA PURPUREA, THROUGHOUT MICHIGAN  - DR. MARGARET (MAGGIE) HANES  Numerous historical and biological processes have likely contributed to the complex evolution of carnivorous Pitcher Plants in the genus Sarracenia. The talk will summarize population genetic variation in S. purpurea throughout Michigan and identify some of the forces responsible for differentiation. This work brings us closer to identifying the processes that promote speciation in the unique North American Pitcher Plants.

Maggie's love of plants started in her mother’s garden nestled in the Sonoran Desert. During her undergraduate time, she worked for the Grand Canyon botanist doing rare plant surveys throughout the canyon. After graduation she worked for the Missouri Botanical Garden developing a trilingual newsletter for the conservation of the Malagasy Flora. This inspired her to pursue her PhD looking at the systematics and biogeography of Hibiscus and relatives on Madagascar. More recently she has investigated the evolution of North American pitcher plants. Dr. Hanes is currently an Assistant Professor of Botany and Director of the EMC Herbarium at Eastern Michigan University.

2014 Huron Valley Chapter Field Trips

Field Trips are open to the general public unless otherwise indicated.  Members who are interested in attending a "members only" field trip should register with field trip coordinator, Robert Ayotte, at Oikos14@Outlook.com.  Members planning to Car pool should bring directions and leave in plenty of time to arrive at field trip sites at the designated time. 

 

Saturday 15 February 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. - Winter Wildflowers (and more) at Independence Lake County Park (Postponed)
 
Leader: Larry Noodén

Join us in exploring Independence Lake County Park at a special time of the year. We will look at plant remnants carrying over from the growing season and some special winter features/natural history. As you know, this park has highly varied habitats and some great sites, so there will be lots to see.
We will meet at the Beach Center/Park Headquarters and then walk back to the upland meadow and associated forests.
If the snow remains too deep for easy movement and finding our specimens, or if the weather is bad, we may postpone this trip. That decision would be e-mailed to the HVC.
Independence Lake County Park (Park Pass will be required)
3200 Jennings Rd.
Webster Township
Whitmore Lake, MI 48189
Here is a park brochure with a map and directions: http://www.ewashtenaw.org/government/departments/parks_recreation/forms%20and%20publications/brochure/brochure_indy.pdf


 
Sunday 13 April 2:00 to 4:00 p.m. - Along the River - Botany Hike at Ervin-Stucki Preserve.

Leader: Faye Stoner (WCPRC Program)

On this hike we will look at the trees, shrubs, ferns, and early wildflowers found in this floodplain forest, along the River Raisin, in Bridgewater Township.  Wear boots in case of muddy terrain.


 
Saturday 19 April 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. - Horner Woods Garlic Mustard Pull and Twinleaf Hunt

Leader: Sylvia Taylor

Join volunteers from the Michigan Botanical Club and MBGNA to scout for the invasive garlic mustard and help with light trail maintenance at Horner Woods, a wildflower sanctuary NE of Matthaei Botanical Gardens. Volunteers will also enjoy seeing large patches of a lovely native wildflower, Twinleaf, which will be in peak bloom in late April. Please dress for physical, outdoor work. Sturdy closed-toe shoes are required. We provide tools and orientation. Minors are welcome with permission forms; those under 16 must be accompanied by a parent/guardian. Meet in the west lobby at Matthaei Botanical Gardens 1800 N. Dixboro Rd. to caravan to Horner Woods.


 
Sunday 27 April 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. - Easy Bryophytes at Waterloo Discovery Center

Leaders: Jim Toppin and Janet Traub

Bryophytes inhabit millimeter-scale microclimates with temperature, humidity, wind speed conditions far different from surrounding weather conditions. We'll focus on the most recognizable and memorable mosses, liverworts and (maybe!) hornworts out of the at least 100-120 kinds that are probably in the area. We'll particularly keep an eye out for the "feather mosses". These are large and showy (in bryophyte terms, at least) mosses that are more common northward. We should find at least 12 bryophyte families.  To add some color to our green bryophyte world, we'll jump kingdoms and enjoy some of the lichens that often live in bryophyte communities.  Meet Inside the Eddy Discovery Center at 17030 Bush Road, Chelsea, MI 48118 (ph: 734-475-3170

 

Saturday 3 May 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.: Wildflower walk at Scio Woods Preserve

Leader: Faye Stoner (WCPRC Program)

Visit this lovely preserve, in Scio Twp., and learn many of se Michigan’s common, and a few not so common, spring wildflowers.


 
Saturday 17 May 3:00 p.m.: Minong-Petersburg Prairie of Petersburg St. Game Area

Leader: Tony Reznicek

Located in western Monroe County, the Lake Erie Plain once supported a rich matrix of extensive lowland prairie, oak savanna, flatwoods, and swamps. The prairies were drained and brought under the plow, the forests cut, and the lack of fire let the savanna become oak woods. In this natural area, a tiny fraction of the original lakeplain oak opening complex remains. Mesic sand prairie on lower ground between remnant oak savannas on low ancient beach ridges is being restored by the MDNR Wildlife Division and local volunteers. A variety of colorful prairie wildflowers may be seen from May through September, such as butterflyweed, tall coreopsis, sunflowers, blazing star, wood lily, culver's root, prairie rose, ironweed, New England aster and blue gentians. Tall prairie grasses also abound.


 
Saturday 24 May 1:00 to 4:00 p.m.: Horner Woods Garlic Mustard Pull  - Part 2 (Memorial Day Weekend)

Trip Leader: Sylvia Taylor

Join volunteers from the Michigan Botanical Club and MBGNA as they continue to remove invasive garlic mustard at Horner Woods, a wildflower sanctuary NE of Matthaei Botanical Gardens. In late May, Garlic Mustard will be in bloom and more easily identifiable for removal. Please dress for physical, outdoor work. Sturdy closed-toe shoes are required. We provide tools and orientation. Minors are welcome with permission forms; those under 16 must be accompanied by a parent/guardian. Meet at Matthaei Botanical Gardens, 1800 N. Dixboro Rd., near the back horticulture entrance (due to the second spring plant sale that will be held partly in the west lobby), to caravan to Horner Woods.


 
Saturday 21 June 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.: Sand Creek Nature Preserve (TNC)

Leader: Matt Schultz: Regional Stewardship Organizer

Michigan Nature Association’s Sand Creek Prairie Plant Preserve is a small but high quality example of a dry sand prairie and oak barrens, especially for Hillsdale County. We will explore the preserve and see many uncommon native species. Of particular note is the population of Hill’s thistle, which should be in bloom during the visit. Hill’s thistle is more commonly found in the Jack pine barrens of the northern lower peninsula.
 


Sunday 22 June 2:00 p.m.:  Exploring the Legacy Land Conservancy’s Reichert Preserve

Leader: Bev Walters

Come along to botanize in the varied terrain of this recently acquired preserve.  We’ll explore the wet meadow, swamp, fen, and dry oak forest habitats surrounding two kettle lakes and numerous ponds.  Be prepared for wet feet and bugs!

Due to the sensitive nature of some areas, field trip size is limited.  Contact Dana Wright at Legacy to register, she will keep you informed about parking info and insect density:  For Carpooling, leave from the Miller Park-n-Ride at 1:30 p.m.  dana@legacylandconservancy.org   734.302.5263  ext. 302

 

Saturday 13 September, 12:00 pm to 4:00 pm: Fentastic Fens of Waterloo Recreation Area 

Leader: Brad Slaughter

Join MNFI Botanist Brad Slaughter for an exploration of Harr Road Fen and various wet mesic prairies.  Meet in Downtown Chelsea at the Clocktower parking lot in front of the Teddy Bear Factory.  Be prepared for wet and or boggy surficial substrates. 

 

Saturday 20 September 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. - Grasses along West River Trail, Hudson Mills.

Trip Leaders:  Ron Gamble and Faye Stoner.

Park at Hudson Mills, Rapids View lot (first two right turns after the Toll Booth, pay HCMA entry fee, or have annual sticker).  Mostly easy walking along asphalt trail, about 3.5 miles roundtrip.  You can turn around whenever you want as we will return the same way we came.   We should look at around a dozen grasses, plus some other selected forbs.  This is the north end of Dexter-Hudson Mills Connector Trail.  (Pit toilets only at Rapids View, and no comfort utilities along this trail.  Full utilities at River Grove parking area, just prior to Rapids View.)

 

Saturday 27 September 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. – Goll Woods State Nature Preserve

Leader: Ryan Schroeder: ODNR Northwest District Preserve Manager

Goll Woods, a remnant of the Great Black Swamp, is the least disturbed woodland known to remain in extreme northwestern Ohio. This 321 acre preserve features some of the largest trees remaining in the state.  We will focus on the ecology of the swamp forest, and consider the many asters and goldenrods that will be in bloom.
Goll Woods exemplifies a forest ecosystem which once covered a vast area of the flat post-glacial lake plains southwest of Lake Erie. An outstanding feature of these woods is the abundance of giant bur oaks and exceptionally large white oaks, chinquapin oaks and cottonwoods. Many of these magnificent trees are 200-400 years old and measure 4 feet in diameter. A rich variety of native shrubs and wildflowers occur in the woods including spotted coral-root and three-birds-orchid.
 Location: From Archbold in Fulton County, go north on State Rte 66 for 1-1/2 miles to Township Rd F, go west for 3 miles to the junction with Township Rd 26, go south about 1/4 mile to the preserve parking lot located on the east side of the road.

 


 Saturday 11 October 10 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. – River Raisin Floodplain Botany

Trip Leader: Neal Billetdeaux

Located in the southwest corner of Washtenaw County, Eric and Franzi van der Schalie reside on 17 acres of wonderful wet meadow, fen, oak uplands and River Raisin floodplain forest. They have generously offered a view of their property to the MBC.  We will use a maintained trail network to discuss the ecological processes that generated the varied habitat types. Due to limited parking (6 cars total), field trip size is limited. Contact Neal Billetdeaux to register. He will provide information about carpooling and site access.
Neal.billetdeaux@smithgroupjjr.com<mailto:Neal.billetdeaux@smithgroupjjr.com>  734.669.2708

 

 

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Past Huron Valley Chapter Field Trips

2013

Saturday 16 March, 10 am to 1 pm: "Conifers of Nichol's Arboretum" Trip Leader: Ron Gamble/Robert Ayotte

Nichol's Arboretum displays conifers native to Michigan, North America, Asia, and more. This hike, a follow-up on the presentation by Neal Billetdeaux, will focus on conifer biology, ecology, and phytogeopgraphy.

Coneheads should meet at the James Reader Jr. Urban Environmental Center on Washington Heights. We'll discuss and admire a broad array of gymnosperms in a loop covering about 2 miles, with some steep hills. Wear your yak-trax if it is icy. Free parking is available at 1) the Markley Hall Parking Lot, 2) adjacent to the UM Hospital helicopter pad, and 3) on the street along Washington Heights.

Saturday 13 April, 10 am to 1 pm: "The Hunt for Harbinger-of-Spring at Dexter-Huron Metropark"

Trip Leader: Robert Ayotte

As of 27 March, due to a cooler spring, there is little spring ephemeral activity at Dexter-Huron Metropark. A survey on 26 March showed the spathes of skunk cabbage poking through ice covered pools. So, we will shoot for 13 April.

The lovely small woodlot near the Huron River has a wealth of wildflowers, and we’ll look for other early starters, such as bloodroot and the large patches of false rue-anemone and trout lilies. The wild ginger and cut-leaved toothwort typically appear later, but who knows what this weather pattern might bring. Large Chinquapin oaks also live here. Meet in the east parking lot (furthest from the entry). The park is located on Huron River Dr. about a mile down river (east) of Dexter.

Saturday 20 April, 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm: "Eco-restoration Volunteer Workday & WIldflower Walk at Horner Woods"

Trip Leader: Sylvia Taylor

Join volunteers from the Michigan Botanical Club to scout for the invasive garlic mustard and help with light trail maintenance at Horner Woods, a wildflower sanctuary NE of Matthaei Botanical Gardens. Volunteers will also enjoy seeing large patches of a lovely native wildflower, Twinleaf, which will be in peak bloom in late April. Please dress for physical, outdoor work. Sturdy closed-toe shoes are required. We provide tools and orientation. Minors are welcome with permission forms; those under 16 must be accompanied by a parent/guardian. Meet in the west lobby at Matthaei Botanical Gardens 1800 N. Dixboro Rd. to caravan to Horner Woods.

Saturday 11 May, 10 am to 1 pm: "Spring Ephemerals of Nan Weston Nature Preserve"

Trip Leaders: Neal Billetdeaux and Robert Ayotte

The variety of plant communities at Nan Weston Nature Preserve at Sharon Hollow reflects the amazing underlying geological diversity of the area. We will provide an introduction to the ecology of the area and explore the spring ephemerals. Wear sturdy walking shoes, dress for the weather, and be prepared for September insects. From Chelsea, Michigan: • At the junction of I-94 and M-52 (Exit 159), take M-52 south for 7.4 miles to Pleasant Lake Road. There is a flashing yellow light at the intersection. • Turn right (west) on Pleasant Lake Road, follow it for 3.2 miles to Sharon Hollow Road. • Where Sharon Hollow Road curves sharply to the south, go straight (toward sign for Sharon Mills parking) and turn right (north) on Sharon Hollow Road (dirt), and follow to Easudes Road. • Turn left (west) and travel 0.9 miles on Easudes Road. You will see the preserve sign on the left (south) side of the road. • Park on the south side of Easudes Road, between the preserve sign and Jacob Road. The trail into the preserve begins at the sign. Please be sure not to block any of the preserve neighbors’ driveways. Contact: neal.billetdeaux@smithgroupjjr.com (734) 604-6682.

Saturday 18 May, 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm: "Eco-restoration Workday at Horner Woods"

Trip Leader: Sylvia Taylor

Join volunteers from the Michigan Botanical Club as they continue to remove invasive garlic mustard at Horner Woods, a wildflower sanctuary NE of Matthaei Botanical Gardens. In late May, Garlic Mustard will be in bloom and more easily identifiable for removal. Please dress for physical, outdoor work. Sturdy closed-toe shoes are required. We provide tools and orientation. Minors are welcome with permission forms; those under 16 must be accompanied by a parent/guardian. Meet at Matthaei Botanical Gardens, 1800 N. Dixboro Rd., near the back horticulture entrance (due to the second spring plant sale that will be held partly in the west lobby), to caravan to Horner Woods.

Saturday 18 May, 9:30 a.m. to Noon: "Exploring the Flatwoods: Lakeplain Oak Openings Communities of NW Ohio and SE Michigan"  Oakwoods (Huron-Clinton) Metropark near Flat Rock, MI

Trip Leader: Ron Gamble

We’ll explore the mature "flatwoods" and examine the physiographic, soil, and vegetative characteristics that differentiate this ecosystem from floodplain forests and deciduous swamps. Pin oak, other large trees, and an open understory will highlight this walk. Footing should be stable, however wear shoes/boots that can get wet/muddy as this will include off-trail hiking. Mosquitoes and spring wildflowers are probable. Michigan Botanical Club (Ron Gamble) and Huron-Clinton Metroparks host this walk. There is more information about “Oak Openings” and Blue Week at: Blue Week 2013. Meet at the Nature Center in Oakwoods Metropark (East of I-275 at Sibley X Vining roads, go south about 3 miles on Vining, bear right at Michigan Memorial Cemetery, continue about half mile to park entrance on left). The outing is free, however there is an HCMA Park entry fee.

May 24-27: MBC Spring Foray

White Pine Chapter hosting at Calvin College, Grand Rapids, MI.

Saturday 22 June, 10 am to 1 pm, "Kitty Todd Preserve" in Swanton, Ohio.

Trip Leaders: Jim Toppin/Janet Traub

We’ll enjoy the great diversity of plants and animals here by touring a variety of lakeplain habitats, including sand barrens, oak savanna, wet-mesic flatwoods, and tallgrass prairie. The hike will be a maximum of 2 miles with fairly easy walking, mainly on trails, in very flat terrain with a few low sand dunes. We’ll be hiking largely in dry to mesic areas, but rainy weather could make for some wetter ground in places, so consider appropriate footwear. With a recent land acquisition, the preserve now protects 1000 acres, and we’ll see some results of the active stewardship work done by staff and volunteers. Meet at the Kitty Todd office, 10420 Old State Line Road. From Ann Arbor, take US 23 south into Ohio to exit 8 West - Airport Highway/Route 2. Take Airport Highway west about 5 miles to Eber Road, turn north on Eber and go about 1 mile until it dead-ends at Old State Line Road, then go west about a half mile to the preserve office on the north side of the road.  Those wishing to carpool should leave from Briarwood Sears at 8:45; it is a 1 hour drive under normal traffic conditions.

Saturday 3 August, 10 am to noon: “Swift Run Prairie”  Trip Leader: Bev Walters

Nestled between SE Ann Arbor and the headwaters of Swift Run creekshed, a little-known mesic prairie remnant is thriving. Owned by the Washtenaw County Drain Commissioner and stewarded in partnership with Ann Arbor’s Natural Area Preservation, it has been transformed from several small room-sized prairie pockets to several acres of open prairie dominated by big bluestem and prairie dock. On the way there we’ll pass huge old burr oaks that probably stood sentinel when the area was first settled. For those inclined to explore the area further on their own, the woodland trail loop through Mary Beth Doyle Nature Area to the north is well worth a visit.

Directions: From Platt Rd. in Ann Arbor take Verle St. 0.25 miles W to Eddy St and turn S. Park on Verle St. or Eddy St. We’ll meet at the Eddy St. dead end.

Saturday 14 September, 10:00 am to 1:00 pm: "Late summer flora of southeastern Michigan"

Trip Leader: Brad Slaughter

We will begin this journey exploring the floodplain and mesic hardwoods along the Huron River, where we will see typical late-flowering forest plants such as bluestem goldenrod (Solidago caesia), zigzag goldenrod (S. flexicaulis), and tall white lettuce (Prenanthes altissima), in addition to species that flowered in spring but persist under the forest canopy, including white baneberry (Actaea pachypoda), red baneberry (A. rubra), and large white trillium (Trillium grandiflorum). The forested floodplain in this area will reveal additional choice species, including lizard’s-tail (Saururus cernuus), great blue lobelia (Lobelia siphilitica), and bladdernut (Staphylea trifolia). Following our exploration of these forested communities, we will venture into a habitat of a very different sort, a secondary prairie developed on the former “Shanghai” gravel pit. Here, we expect to find typical late summer flora of the prairie and savanna, including stiff goldenrod (Solidago rigida), Riddell’s goldenrod (S. riddellii), showy goldenrod (S. speciosa), smooth aster (Symphyotrichum laeve), northern blazing-star (Liatris scariosa), prairie ladies’-tresses (Spiranthes magnicamporum), and perhaps the first of the fringed gentians (Gentianopsis crinita). In addition to these species and a diversity of other interesting plants, a couple unusual rarities may rear their inflorescences (or infructescences). The trails should be dry and the insects should not bite, but expect to traverse one or two sets of steps uphill.

Let’s meet at 9:30 AM in the parking lot of the Matthaei Botanical Gardens and carpool to the site.

 Sunday 22 September, 1:30 pm to 4:00 pm: Return to Dexter-Huron Metropark

Leader Tony Reznicek, Coordinators, Toni Spears and Larry Noodén

This will be a followup to our field trip back in the early spring (April 13). Those who were there will remember that we could see promises of a lot of great things to come later in the growing season. During the Apr 13 trip, we also talked about the status of the restoration work along the newly built trail.  On this visit, we will have a look at these restorations.  It looked good in April, but there may be some problems that we can diagnose and advise on.  Meet in the parking lot closest to the Dexter- Huron bridge.  The bridge is visible as you enter the park.  Turn right and right again, after the toll booth. The park is located on Huron River Dr. about a mile down river (roughly southeast) from Dexter).  Call Larry Noodén at 734-663-5667(H) or 734-945-3129(C) if you have any questions.

Saturday 28 September, 10:00 am to 1:00 pm: "Storer Fen"

Trip Leader: Jim Mohr

Fens are another of the rare and special ecosystems of Michigan.   Moist, calcareous soils support a special association of plant species that are rarely seen. The fens at Storer developed on marl flats that were exposed when the lake level was dropped in 1868 by the development of a drainage ditch at the outlet of the lake. The marl had previously been deposited in the shallow areas of the lake by the algae Chara.  Sand ridges within the marl flats add to the diversity.  A rich prairie-fen flora has been developing in those relatively-undisturbed wetlands since that time.  Members the Huron chapter of the MBC surveyed the species in the South Fen in May, July and September of 2005.  A total of 144 species of native plants were recorded, and a FQI of 57 was derived. Four other fen areas exist around the lake, and we will visit as time allows.

There will be a short introduction at the Environmental Studies Center building. Then we will walk through the South Fen, observing and discussing the fen ecosystem and the species seen, and possibly discovering some species not previously recorded.  Wear footwear that can get wet, especially if it has rained recently. Dress for the weather.

After a bag lunch, those who wish will be able to visit another of the fens.

DIRECTIONS TO YMCA STORER CAMPS:

Directions to the Storer Field Trips: 7260 South Stony Lake Rd, Jackson MI.

The Environmental Studies Center of YMCA Storer Camps is located southwest of Napoleon, Michigan.  Travel south of the flashing light on M-50 in Napoleon, and head west on Stony Lake Road. The road splits into N & S Stony Lake Roads.  Stay left, in spite of the Storer sign that points you to their main entrance on N Stony Lake Road; go about two miles to the south entrance.  Enter the camp and drive north on the entrance road. Follow signs to the Environmental Studies Center building.  Park by the building. Garmin GPS address: 7260 S Stoney Lake Rd.  Jackson MI

Sunday 20 October, 1 pm: "Workday and Botanizing at Horner Woods"   Trip leader: Sylvia Taylor  

Sylvia Taylor, MBC/HVC members, a Matthaei Botanical Gardens caretaker, and students from the "Ecological Issues" class will remove buckthorn and Euonymus, after a short excursion through the adjacent 12 acre old growth Oak forest preserve; (a parcel recently acquired by Washtenaw County Parks and Recreation).  Members not interested in staying for invasives removal are welcome to attend only the field trip.  Meet at Matthaei Botanical Gardens, 1800 N. Dixboro  Road (west lobby), Ann Arbor, for sign-in and carpooling to the site.  (Volunteers should park in the regular west visitor lot.)

Saturday 26 October, 10 am to Noon:  "Resplendent Fall Woodies at Huron Meadows Metropark"

Trip Leader: Robert Ayotte

Huron Meadows contains a diversity of forest ecosystems including floodplain, swamp, and upland forests.  This time of year the canopies are brilliant!  Let's take a stroll through American beech-Sugar Maple and Oak-Hickory forests and celebrate the arrival of fall.  The focus will be woody plants, but we won't ignore interesting herbs along the way.  Expect to walk about 2 miles on pretty easy pathways and boardwalks.  Huron Meadows Metropark is located at 8765 Hammel Rd, Brighton, MI, 48116.  Meet at the South Trailhead near the canoe takeout. 

Past Field Trips - Spring 2012

Saturday 07 April, 2012 10:00 am: The Hunt for Harbinger of Spring 

Trip Leaders: Ron Gamble and Robert Ayotte - Early April is the beginning of the spring wildflower season, and we hope to find one of the earliest bloomers, harbinger-of-spring, which have been observed previously at this Metropark.  The lovely small woodlot near the Huron River has a wealth of wildflowers, and we’ll look for other early starters, such as bloodrootand the large patches of false rue-anemone and trout lilies.  The wild ginger and cut-leaved toothwort typically appear later, but who knows what this weather pattern might bring.  Large Chinquapin oaks also live here. Meet in the east parking lot (furthest from the entry).  The park is located on Huron River Dr. about a mile down river (east) of Dexter.  See also:

http://metroparks.com/parks/index_all.aspx?ID=2

Saturday 21 April, 2012 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm: Eco-Restoration Volunteer Workday & Wildflower Walk at Horner Woods. Trip Leader: Sylvia Taylor.  Join volunteers from the Michigan Botanical Club to scout for the invasive garlic mustard and help with light trail maintenance at Horner Woods, a wildflower sanctuary NE of Matthaei Botanical Gardens. Volunteers will also enjoy seeing large patches of a lovely native wildflower, Twinleaf, which will be in peak bloom in late April. Please dress for physical, outdoor work. Sturdy closed-toe shoes are required. We provide tools and orientation.Minors are welcome with permission forms; those under 16 must be accompanied by a parent/guardian. Meet in the west lobby at Matthaei Botanical Gardens 1800 N. Dixboro Rd. to caravan to Horner Woods. 

Saturday 19 May 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm: Eco-restoration Volunteer Workday at Horner Woods

Join volunteers from the Michigan Botanical Club as they continue to remove invasive garlic mustard at Horner Woods, a wildflower sanctuary NE of Matthaei Botanical Gardens. In late May, Garlic Mustard will be in bloom and more easily identifiable for removal. Please dress for physical, outdoor work. Sturdy closed-toe shoes are required. We provide tools and orientation. Minors are welcome with permission forms; those under 16 must be accompanied by a parent/guardian. Meet at Matthaei Botanical Gardens, 1800 N. Dixboro Rd., near the back horticulture entrance (due to the second spring plant sale that will be held partly in the west lobby), to caravan to Horner Woods.

25-28 May: Spring Foray, U Mich Biological Station, Pellston, MI

Saturday 23 June 10:00 am: Kirk Fen    Trip Leader: Connie Crancer.

This foray is limited to 12 people.  Please register with Robert Ayotte at Rayotte14@comcast.net Join Connie Crancer as she gives us a tour of Kirk Fen, a newly restored prairie fen at the University of Michigan Matthaei Botanical Gardens.  We will explore and compare the intact sites to the newly opened sites for typical and special prairie fen species, Cypripedium candidum associates, and calcareous species.  Meet at the West Lobby at MBG – remember we now pay (or use our MBGNA membership number) for parking.  Knee high boots are needed to get out to the site.  The "getting there" is challenging – crossing a incised creekbed and deep muck.

Saturday 21 July 10:00 am: Ives Rd Fen and More  Trip Leader: Bob Smith.

A return trip to Ives Preserve.  This fen will be the focus of this trip.  It is a globally endangered hillside fen of almost 200 acres.  The oldest plant specimens from Lenawee County are from this site from 1832.  Included will be a discussion of current efforts to maintain this habitat.  After a break, those that are interested will visit a site near Blissfield on the River Raisin floodplain.  We will meet at 5909 Raisin Center Hwy, south of Tecumseh.  Follow M-50 into Tecumseh, and turn south onto Evans St, which becomes Raisin Center Hwy.  The trip will be led by Bob Smith, a local botanist.  Boots are required; the walk is strenuous.  Car poolers leave from the Park-N-Ride at M-52 and I-94 (exit 159) in Chelsea at 9:00 am sharp.  Bring lunch.

Saturday 18 August 10:00 am: Botany of Shiawasee NWR  Trip Leader: Steve Kahl.

The trip will focus on NWR native plant refuge programs, including lakeplain prairie restoration and the plant amplification program with the Saginaw Correctional facility.  We will also demonstrate some of the challenges we face such as Phragmites and buckthorn control and the effects of poor water quality effects on ecosystems.  Plants to be seen = Silphium perfoliatum, Silphium terebinthinaceum, Spartina pectinata, Helenium autumnale, Vernonia fasciculata, Cassia hebecarpa, Rudbeckia triloba, Lycopus americanus, Scutellaria lateriflorus, Aster umbellatus. Please register with Robert Ayotte at Rayotte14@Comcast.net.  The refuge headquarters is 0.7 mi west of M-13 on Curtis Road at the intersection w/ Mower Rd.  http://www.fws.gov/midwest/shiawassee/  Car poolers should leave from the Park-N-Ride at M-14 and Miller Rd at 7:45 am sharp.  Bring lunch.

Saturday 25 August: MBC Mini Foray! 
9:00 am to Noon: Fungi of Silver Lake Area: Leader: Dr. Tim James
Fall is the time for mushrooms, and this walk through Pinckney Recreational Area is aimed at observing some of the more prominent fungi that can be found around Silver Lake.  This time of the year is rich in sponge caps or boletes, including the two colored bolete Boletus bicolor, Leccinum aurantiacum, and with luck the brightly blue staining Gyroporus cyanescens.  We are also likely to find milk caps, Lactarius species that bleed a latex when injured, and brightly colored wax caps of genus Hygrocybe.  A two mile hike on the Silver Lake Trail is anticipated. Meet at the upper west parking area of Silver Lake as accessed from Dexter Pinckney Road.                           

1:00 pm to 3:00 pm: Hankerd Prairie Restoration: Leader: Bev Walters.                                                                 This Oak-Savanna offers an interesting array of fire adapted species such as Liatris scarisoa, Viloa pedata, Lithospermum caroliniense, Ceanothus americanus, Rhus copallina, Quercus prinoides, and more.  This ecosystem restoration project has been the focus of a dedicated group of DNR field specialists and volunteer stewards.

Saturday 1 September 10:00 am:  Botany of YMCA Storer Camp – Black Oak Savanna
Trip Leader: Jim Mohr. YMCA Storer Camps is a 1200 acre site southeast of Jackson, Michigan. According to the General Land Office survey of 1825, about 600 of those acres were Black oak barrens before settlement. As in the rest of Michigan, the vast majority of the various oak savannas were cleared as farmland, or were allowed to convert to Oak-hickory forests for use as woodlots. As a result, savannas, are one of the rarest ecosystems in the state. Small remnants of those early savannas can be found in places that were not totally cleared, not plowed, not herbicided, and not heavily grazed and trampled by domestic livestock. Fencerows, tree bases, farm lane borders, steep slopes, isolated and odd areas, and the previously mentioned woodlots often contain remnant savanna plants. Wide-spreading oak and hickory trees indicate savanna remnants. Storer has all of those types of places, inhabited by indicator species including numerous open-grown oak trees that were part of the pre-settlement savanna over 200 years ago. There will be a short introduction at the Environmental Studies Center building. We will then visit some of the best savanna remnants, continue the discussion of savannas, and see classic savanna forbs, grasses, sedges shrubs and trees. It is most likely that we will discover savanna plant species new to Storer, and possibly new to Jackson county. Wear sturdy walking shoes, dress for the weather, and be prepared for September insects.
DIRECTIONS TO YMCA STORER CAMPS: 7260 South Stony Lake Rd, Jackson MI. The Environmental Studies Center of YMCA Storer Camps is located southwest of Napoleon, Michigan.  Just south of the flashing light on M-50 in Napoleon.  Head west on  Stony Lake Road; the road splits into N & S Stony Lake Roads.  Stay left, in spite of the Storer sign that points you to their main entrance on N Stony Lake Road; go about two miles to the south entrance.  Enter the camp and drive north on the entrance road. Follow signs to the Environmental Studies Center building. Parking is by the building.  Garmin GPS address: 7260 S Stoney Lake R, Jackson, MI (may need to use Napoleon MI as city). Car poolers should leave from the Park-N-Ride at M-14 and Miller Rd at 9:00 am sharp.  Bring lunch.

Sunday 9 September 2:00 - ca. 4:00 pm: Goldenrods and More - Independance Lake                             Trip Leader: Ron Gamble. Independence Lake Wastenow County Park :3200 Jennings Road, Whitmore Lake, MI. Meet at Beach Center Parking Lot. There is a large oak tree on the lake-side of the parking lot, about the middle of that side:  Meet there for 2:00 p.m. start. There is likely a Park entry fee.  Restroom facilities are scheduled to be open. 

Saturday 29 September 2:00-4:00 pm:  Fall Woodies - Nan Weston Nature Preserve at Sharon Hollow
Trip Leaders: Neal Billetdeaux/Robert Ayotte. The variety of plant communities at Nan Weston Nature Preserve at Sharon Hollow reflects the amazing underlying geological diversity of the area.  We will provide an introduction to the ecology of the area and fall is the best time of year to view the distinctive vegetative characteristics of woody plants.  This trip will focus on trees and shrubs of rich mesic and lowland woods.  It is also a great opportunity to view some of the woodland goldenrods, asters and ferns.  Wear sturdy walking shoes, dress for the weather, and be prepared for September insects. From Chelsea, Michigan: • At the junction of I-94 and M-52 (Exit 159), take M-52 south for 7.4 miles to Pleasant Lake Road. There is a flashing yellow light at the intersection. • Turn right (west) on Pleasant Lake Road, follow it for 3.2 miles to Sharon Hollow Road. • Where Sharon Hollow Road curves sharply to the south, go straight (toward sign for Sharon Mills parking) and turn right (north) on Sharon Hollow Road (dirt), and follow to Easudes Road. • Turn left (west) and travel 0.9 miles on Easudes Road. You will see the preserve sign on the left (south) side of the road. • Park on the south side of Easudes Road, between the preserve sign and Jacob Road. The trail into the preserve begins at the sign. Please be sure not to block any of the preserve neighbors’ driveways. Questions? Contact: neal.billetdeaux@smithgroupjjr.com  (734) 604-6682

October 14 "Fall Frolic Nature Walk at Morris-Reichert Nature Preserve", Trip leader: Robert Ayotte. Join Conservancy friends for a colorful hike through Morris-Reichert Nature Preserve. Gather between 1:30-2:00 p.m. for snacks, beverages, and socializing with Conservancy friends at the preserve entrance. Then from 2:00-3:30 we will walk about 1.5 miles; be ready for variable fall weather. No pets please. Donations are welcome in support of the Conservancy. 

For more info Contact Scott Tyrrell ( styrrell@SMLCland.org (734) 484-6565)

October 20 Workday and Botanizing at Horner Woods: Sylvia Taylor  

"Workday and Botanizing at Horner Woods", Trip leader: Dr. Sylvia Taylor. Join Sylvia and mentor Matthaei  volunteers on HVC's last fieldtrip of 2012 for trail maintenance,  buckthorn removal and botanizing in this wildflower sanctuary and  old-growth forest.  Meet at Matthaei Botanical Gardens, 1800 N. Dixboro  Road (west lobby), Ann Arbor for sign-in and carpolling to the site.  

Past Huron Valley Chapter Meetings 2012 - 2013

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2012  - ISLE ROYALE: BOTANY AND THE BACKPACKING EXPERIENCE presented by Faye Stoner, Naturalist for Washtenaw County Parks and Recreation, and MBC-HVC member.    Isle Royale offers so many things to folks who appreciate the outdoors! In this presentation, a main focus will be given to the plants in bloom and in fruit on the island in August, but mammals, birds, backpacking opportunities and more will also be discussed.    Faye Stoner is currently a naturalist with Washtenaw County Parks and Recreation and has worked in this position since 1999.  Faye has also worked as a naturalist for the Huron-Clinton Metroparks, for the Pennsylvania State Parks and for the Holden Arboretum near Cleveland. Being a naturalist, Faye often says that she "knows a little bit about lots of things in the outdoors."   Birds were her first big area of nature study, beginning to birdwatch at age 12. A strong interest in botany did not come to her until much later in her life, but now botanizing gives as much pleasure as birding does! 

MONDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2012 - THE NATIVE LANDSCAPE DESIGNS BY JENS JENSEN AND HIS CONTEMPORARIES  presented by Robert E. Grese. The landscape architect Jens Jensen (1860-1951) celebrated the unique heritage and beauty of the midwestern landscape in parks and gardens throughout the region. While much of his work was centered in Chicago, Jensen created a series of landscape designs in Michigan, including much work for the Ford family in Southeast Michigan.  Bob Grese will explore elements of Jensen's approach to native gardens as well as that of his contemporaries such as O.C. Simonds who designed Nichols Arboretum in Ann Arbor.

Bob Grese is Director of Matthaei Botanical Gardens and Nichols Arboretum and Professor of Landscape Architecture at the University of Michigan's School of Natural Resources and Environment.  He is the author of JENS JENSEN: MAKER OF NATURAL PARKS AND GARDENS and the recent NATIVE LANDSCAPE READER, a collection of writings by Jens Jensen, O.C. Simonds and their contemporaries. Joint with Ann Arbor Wild Ones.

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2012 -  SPECTACULAR BRYOPHYTES OF WINTER presented by Jim Toppin and Janet Traub of Lucas County, Ohio. Winter is a great time for looking at mosses and liverworts throughout Michigan. Take a close look almost anywhere and you will see scenery and diversity that are largely unnoticed. Jim and Janet will show where to look and what to look for and also will explore the fascinating role of bryophytes in the history of life and the history of science.

They live near Toledo. Jim and Janet got interested in mosses and liverworts while hiking around the Oak Openings and learning about native plants. They took Charles Arzeni’s short course on bryophytes at Leelanau School. They are  members of the Ohio Moss and Lichen Association, which is working to compile species lists for Ohio counties and encourage the study of mosses and lichens. Jim is a freelance language translator. Janet is close to securing a master’s degree related to remote sensing at the University of Toledo.  Some may remember Jim  and Janet from  the  2010 MBC Spring foray in the Toledo area where they were field trip leaders.

MONDAY, JANUARY 21, 2013  -  FLORAL GEMS OF THE MATTHAEI BOTANICAL GARDENS AND NICHOLS ARBORETUM PROPERTIES presented by Connie J. Crancer, University of Michigan Matthaei Botanical Gardens and Nichols Arboretum, Natural Areas - Native Plants specialist.  The talk will highlight species of rare, endangered, threatened and special concern species found in the various properties which are under stewardship by the Matthaei Botanical Gardens and Nichols Arboretum during a two year intensive floral inventory by Bev Walters with Mary Hejna and Connie Crancer as assistants.  This project was sponsored by the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

Connie Crancer is enjoying her 24th year working for the University of Michigan Botanical Gardens and Arboretum and currently is the Native Plant Specialist within the Natural Areas Department.  Her work is a mix of horticulture, botany and ecology.  Her main duties include native seed collection, processing, dissemination and propagation; native plant gardening; and floristic monitoring.  She earned her Bachelors of Science from Michigan State University, Horticulture Department in 1981 and her Masters of Science from the University of Michigan, School of Natural Resources and Environment in 2011. She is also a long time member of the Huron Valley Chapter, serving as Vice President at one time. 

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2013 GYMNOSPERMS AND YEW presented by Neal Billetdeaux, SmithGroupJJR, landscape architect and woody plants expert. Gymnosperms are an ancient group of vascular plants that produce seeds but not flowers.  Worldwide, they include a diverse collection of plant types.  In Michigan, these are represented by several conifers including pines, junipers, larches, hemlocks, spruces and yews.  This discussion will provide a brief survey of gymnosperm systematics, biology and ecology with a focus on conifers native to Michigan. This is a precursor to the upcoming fieldtrip to view the conifers of Nichols Arboretum with Robert Ayotte, Saturday, March 16, 2013.

Neal Billetdeaux is a Landscape Architect and Principal with 22 years of experience at SmithGroupJJR.  He graduated from the University of Michigan School of Natural Resources (BS1982) with an undergraduate degree that focused on botany and ecology.  This was followed by a graduate program in Landscape Architecture (MLA1987).  During his graduate studies, he had the honor of teaching Woody Plants field labs with Burt Barnes and Herb Wagner, an experience that shaped his life and remains central to his interests today.

MONDAY, MARCH  18 - BOTANY AND RESTORATION AT IVES ROAD FEN, presented by Chuck Pearson Restoration Ecologist for TNC.    Chuck Pearson has been leading the volunteer ecological restoration program at The Nature Conservancy’s Ives Road Fen Preserve since 2004.  He and the volunteers have restored more than 300 acres of floodplain forest, upland and prairie fen, using hand pulling, cutting and stump treating, foliar spraying, planting and prescribed burns. He is also active with the Stewardship Network and Michigan Nature Association.  He has engineering degrees from Cornell and Wayne State and worked as an engineer at Ford Motor Company for 25 years before becoming a restoration ecologist.

The Nature Conservancy’s Ives Road Fen Preserve, near Tecumseh, has more than 700 species of plants.  This presentation will show many of those plants in bloom along with some of the butterflies and other animals in the preserve that depend on the plants.  The native species of the preserve are threatened by invasive species.  The presentation will also discuss techniques used in restoration and the results.  These techniques are applicable to other natural areas, both large and small.

MONDAY, APRIL 15 - THE ECOLOGICAL ROLES OF FUNGI, presented by Paul Olexia, Professor of Biology, Emeritus, Kalamazoo College.    Diversity of fungi groups will be discussed, including biology of their hyphae filaments which secrete digestive enzymes.  Different, yet basic, life strategies will be addressed
which affect soil quality, and also have other consequences.

 

 

Archived Material from the Huron Valley Chapter can be found here.